The Definitive Guide to Influencer Marketing: Chapter 2

CAMPAIGN DEFINITION

Chapter 2:

CAMPAIGN DEFINITION

Like most things in life, marketing campaigns rarely pay off if you don’t put in the hard work beforehand. In order to have great results, you have to approach your campaign from a strategic perspective from the very outset. And that starts here, with campaign definition. Keep reading to learn all about the types of campaigns that exist, how to create a marketing proposal, and more.

Before you even start thinking about the campaign, there are some general caveats we’d like to point out. Keeping these in mind will help you define a campaign that’s realistic for you, which will in turn lead to greater chance of success.


Before you start

1. Understand your investment capacity


Decide now what you can offer an influencer as incentive, and what the value of that is. Keep in mind that incentives can be monetary or non-monetary. For some influencers, products or experiences may be sufficient compensation. This depends primarily on two factors: the influencer’s status and the perceived value of your product. An influencer with 1M followers will require more compensation than one with 1K. Likewise, a fancy watch will be a more attractive incentive than a pack of cookies.


2. Don’t forget about shipping and handling


Despite the rampant digitalization of our world, sending and receiving items is still a very physical process. While product is the cheaper way to incentivize influencers (as the cost is the cost of production), don’t forget about any shipping and handling charges you may incur. If your product isn’t digital, you’re going to have to spend money and time to get it to influencers. Try to eliminate these when possible. For example, offer influencers an email voucher that they can then redeem for what they like.


3. Take the calendar seriously


In an ideal world, everything would go according to schedule. But we know that’s not the case, so it’s essential to leave yourself some leeway in case you run into hurdles. Ideally, you want to start planning and reaching out to influencers at least a month before the target launch date. Furthermore, make sure your marketing calendar is in sync with the other areas of your company. If your campaign goal is sales of a new product, it goes without saying you’ll have to schedule the campaign launch for when the product is already on the market.


4. Establish your target audience


Doing your market research and knowing your target audience will help you narrow down what type of influencer you want. But stay flexible, especially when searching. If you’re targeting people aged 30-35, expand your age range a bit. Who knows, an influencer who’s 28 could be the best person for your campaign. Additionally, don’t forget to also analyze the influencer’s audience to see if they match your target. Heepsy makes this process a lot easier, but you need to show up with flexibility in the right places.


5. Know your limits.


Don’t copy your competitor, however great they may seem. This won’t do anything to help your own brand stand out. Also, be conscious of the creative limits of your brand across sectors and social networks. A huge music festival like Glastonbury– which has a audiovisual product and large teams of people working behind them– has a different creative capacity than a local hardware store, for example. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make influencer marketing work for you. You just need to know what you’re capable of.

When you’re defining your campaign, there are a lot of things to consider. We’ve created a list of important aspects of influencer marketing campaigns to help you get started.

Choosing the type of campaign

REACH

  • Nano influencers (1K - 5K)

    Nanos usually have high engagement with their audience, as they have fewer people to manage. Although you risk the chance that they may be inexperienced, you can usually close a deal with them for product alone. And they’re especially useful for collaborations based on products of low value, such as mobile phone cases.

  • Micro influencers (5K - 50K)

    Considered experts in their fields, micro influencers generally have great engagement and audiences who trust their voices. They are a great way to enter a niche market, and they’re more experienced at collaborating with brands than nano influencers. As long as you’re asking for a reasonable number of posts, you can usually close a deal with Micros for product alone. And if they do ask for a monetary fee, it won’t be much.

  • Medium influencers (50K - 100K)

    At this level, influencers start to get more professional. They’re likely transitioning their social media accounts from a hobby into a full-time job. As a result, Mediums usually ask for a monetary fee in addition to product, and some might already have a manager. Their engagement is generally good, even if it’s lower than that of nano and micro influencers.

  • Macro influencers (100K - 1M)

    Macros are full-time, professional influencers. They’re no strangers to frequent collaborations, and some may even have their own product lines with partner brands. They create polished content and have great reach. However, you’ll see that engagement starts to drop off in this tier. Be prepared to offer both product and a fee for their services. Managers may also drive up the influencer’s fee by about 20%.

  • Mega influencers (1M+)

    “Mega influencer” is basically another way to say celebrity. These are the top of the top, whether because they’re famous outside of social media, or because they’ve grown their profiles to celebrity status. Their content is top-notch and they have professional managers to organize their feeds. But keep in mind that their followers are less-focused and represent a wider range of interests. Followers may also see mega influencers as less authentic than their smaller counterparts. Mega influencers are costly and have low engagement, but their reach is unrivaled.

Influencers can generally be classified into five tiers based on their number of followers:

INFLUENCER TYPE

  • Creators

    These influencers became known because of social media, where they used content creation and commitment to make a name for themselves. They continue to rely on their social media accounts as a way to make money, whether as a full-time job or side gig. In any event, one thing is true: they’re generally receptive to collaborations with brands.

    Creators can often be found working in categories like beauty, fashion, food, fitness, or travel.

  • Personalities

    Think Cristiano or Rihanna, personalities that are famous for their work outside of social media. They usually have huge followings, which are acquired indirectly because of their fame and not purely based on their content creation. They’re more expensive than Creators in the same follower tier, and they’re usually less receptive to collaborations, as social media isn’t their primary source of income.

    Personalities can often be classified as actors, musicians, athletes, artists, or writers.

There are two main paths to social media fame:

CHANNEL

  • Instagram

    Whatever your brand, product or goals, Instagram is an overall great platform to market on. With various media types, clear captions, easy-to-access likes and comments, as well as a wealth of users and data, the social network offers something for everyone.

  • Youtube

    As a video-based platform, Youtube is great for unboxings, how-to’s, explanations/reviews, and capturing experiences. Youtubers can help give life to your product while also explaining any complex or elaborate details.

  • TikTok

    Especially relevant among Gen-Z, TikTok is a rising force in influencer marketing. Its short-form videos are great for quick and to-the-point marketing tidbits, such as food demos, makeover before-and-afters, travel tips, video lookbooks, or challenges.

Every channel is a bit different, and some are better suited for certain campaigns than others. Instagram is the most popular platform overall, with most campaigns including it in some way.

In this guide, we primarily focus on how to run a campaign on Instagram. But most of the information included herein is transferable to other channels.

MEDIA TYPE

  • Unboxings

    The audience gets to see a product exactly how it is when shipped and opened for the first time. The influencer’s candid impressions are key here. If done well, unboxings can generate trust in your product, as potential customers get to experience it without any visible manipulation from manufacturers or marketers.


  • Giveaways

    Ever-popular on Instagram, giveaways allow you to raffle off your products on an influencer’s profile. This content normally generates likes and comments for you and the influencer, although that engagement may not stick once the giveaway is over. In any event, giving away free stuff is a great way to boost interest in your brand. You could even follow up with winners to see if they’re interested in doing a review.

  • Discounts

    Everyone loves to save money, and you can create influencer-specific discounts to help incentivize sales in a more personal way. Also, the links or coupon codes you use will help you track the success of your campaign later on.

Instagram offers various content formats, each with its own advantages.

CONTENT

  • Unboxings

    The audience gets to see a product exactly how it is when shipped and opened for the first time. The influencer’s candid impressions are key here. If done well, unboxings can generate trust in your product, as potential customers get to experience it without any visible manipulation from manufacturers or marketers.


  • Giveaways

    Ever-popular on Instagram, giveaways allow you to raffle off your products on an influencer’s profile. This content normally generates likes and comments for you and the influencer, although that engagement may not stick once the giveaway is over. In any event, giving away free stuff is a great way to boost interest in your brand. You could even follow up with winners to see if they’re interested in doing a review.

  • Discounts

    Everyone loves to save money, and you can create influencer-specific discounts to help incentivize sales in a more personal way. Also, the links or coupon codes you use will help you track the success of your campaign later on.

In addition to considering the type of media you want for your campaign, you should also think about any specific type of content that you’d like to use. As technology advances more each day, the creative possibilities are near endless for what you can do to show off your product or service.

INCENTIVE

  • Product/Service/Experience

    This is an excellent way to pay influencers, especially those who fall in the nano or micro tiers. Also, it’s usually the cheapest way to collaborate, as the cost is just the cost of production and potential shipping.

  • Reposting

    If you plan to repost an influencer’s content, mention that during negotiations. If you’re a big name brand and you give an influencer exposure through your profile, that could be included as an incentive.

  • Flat fee

    Negotiate a one-time fee and pay it through an invoice, PayPay, or another method that is secure and registered. Make sure you have a record of the payment.

  • Cost per acquisition (CPA)

    CPA is a commission-based model that pays influencers based on how many acquisitions they generate for your campaign. Your campaign defines the acquisition based on your objectives, but some common examples are sales, registrations to your site, or newsletter sign-ups. CPA can be measured by tracking links (utms), coupon codes, or other pieces of data unique to the campaign.

    Many influencers may not be inclined to accept CPA alone as payment for the collaboration, it can be used alongside product or a flat fee to create an interesting and attractive incentive package. You could perhaps offer a flat fee a bit lower than normal plus the commissions gained through the CPA strategy.

    Here are two examples of how CPA could work in a campaign:

    1. Fixed rate on an acquisition: Imagine your campaign wants to increase sales at your clothing website. You could offer an influencer $5 on every sale generated through the links on their profile.

    2. Variable on an acquisition: In the same scenario, instead of offering them a fixed rate, you can offer them something like 5% on every sale. If a customer just spends $10, the influencer only gets $0.50. But if another customer spends $300, the influencer will get $15.

How will you pay your influencers? Remember that incentive can be monetary or non-monetary.

FREQUENCY

  • Recurring Campaign

    In this type of campaign, influencers market your brand on a recurring basis. It may be more expensive, but you’re also getting a lot out of it. First, you have constant contact with your target audience. Second, recurring influencers start to turn into brand ambassadors. And third, as the same influencers create content for your campaign throughout the year, you end up with aesthetic consistency, which helps visually identify your brand more easily among followers.

    An example of a recurring campaign is Kiwoko, a Spanish pet store. The brand works with pet influencers on a recurring basis to help promote different seasonal product launches, like summer and Christmas. In between, it focuses on other events going on in the stores, like pet adoptions.

    When managing a recurring campaign, just keep these points in mind:

    - Choose an experienced and reliable influencer
    - Understand that you may need to adapt the campaign to changes in your company or new needs
    - Diversify the types of media used in the campaign so it’s not too repetitive
    - Consider working across channels to reach a larger audience

  • Recurring Campaign

    In this type of campaign, influencers market your brand on a recurring basis. It may be more expensive, but you’re also getting a lot out of it. First, you have constant contact with your target audience. Second, recurring influencers start to turn into brand ambassadors. And third, as the same influencers create content for your campaign throughout the year, you end up with aesthetic consistency, which helps visually identify your brand more easily among followers.

    An example of a recurring campaign is Kiwoko, a Spanish pet store. The brand works with pet influencers on a recurring basis to help promote different seasonal product launches, like summer and Christmas. In between, it focuses on other events going on in the stores, like pet adoptions.

    When managing a recurring campaign, just keep these points in mind:

    - Choose an experienced and reliable influencer
    - Understand that you may need to adapt the campaign to changes in your company or new needs
    - Diversify the types of media used in the campaign so it’s not too repetitive
    - Consider working across channels to reach a larger audience

Another important way to define your campaign is by its duration. Are you pushing your marketing at a certain time of year? Is it seasonal? Do you want something long-term? There are two main types of campaigns:

Tokyo, a golden retriever from Barcelona (@tokyothepuppy) promotes Kiwoko in Summer and Christmas ‘19.

OBJECTIVE

  • Brand awareness

    Raising awareness is particularly important for new brands, or brands that are transitioning into a new market or industry. People are more likely to buy from a brand they know or which has been recommended to them. Influencers can help boost awareness by promoting your product in a way that seems natural and which their audience is more likely to trust.

  • Brand engagement

    If awareness is about how many people know your brand, brand engagement is the customer experience on social media. On Instagram it’s measured by likes and comments. The right influencer can wield an emotional connection with their audience to build an emotional connection with your brand. Also, don’t forget to invite your fans to participate in your brand! Encourage your followers to mention you or use branded hashtags. This is a win-win for you and your followers: they feel more involved, and you get organic exposure.

  • Content creation

    Sometimes, influencer marketing is a great way to supplement your own content marketing. If you strike deals with influencers that allow you to use their content, you can achieve both an ambassador and a content creator at the same time. Just remember to define your aesthetic and outline your content guidelines. This way, if you work with multiple influencers, you’ll end up with content that is visually and thematically cohesive.

  • Conversions

    Whether you’re looking for sales, sign-ups or app downloads, conversions are when you convert leads into completions of your campaign’s objectives. For example, if your goal is to increase sales through your collaboration with an influencer, the conversion might be a purchase made using that influencer’s discount code. Although it’s tempting to think otherwise, conversions aren’t necessarily the best type of objective for every campaign. It all depends on your brand, where it’s currently at, and what it needs.

This is the most important thing to define: what do you hope to get out of this campaign? These are some of the common goals of influencer marketing campaigns.

Having clear objectives is critical for any successful influencer marketing campaign. Once you set your objectives, you can develop your key performance indicators, or KPIs. These are measurable values that illustrate how well a company is achieving its established objectives. KPIs can really be anything, and they vary depending on your objectives. So, for example, if your objective is to boost brand engagement on social media, you may want to measure comments and likes as KPIs.

Before you put your campaign’s wheels in motion, it’s important to analyze the estimated impact against the investment to check if the campaign is viable and worth your effort.

Estimating your campaign’s impact

MEASURING YOUR INVESTMENT

To start, calculate the total investment that the company plans to put into the campaign. Make sure you consider:

  • Target influencers - How many influencers will you work with?

  • Economic fee per influencer - How much will you pay each, in money?

  • Product cost per influencer - For this investment, there are a few things you have to consider. First, what is the market value of your product? Next, what is the cost of goods sold (COGS) of your product? COGS means, basically, the production cost of your product. This is important to know because while the influencer will only know the market value of your product, your investment is based on the COGS.

    For example: Your brand makes sneakers, which sell for $100 per pair in stores. For your campaign, you send a pair to each influencer. But, it only costs $50 in materials and labor for your company to make the sneakers. So really, you’ll be investing $50 in product for each influencer, not $100.

  • Incentive per influencer - What’s the total incentive you’ll provide to each influencer? Here you want to add up the economic fee + product cost per influencer. But remember! The perceived value per influencer will be higher than the total incentive you invest. Why? Because of COGS, of course! While your investment is based on the cost of production, the influencers will only know the market value.

    Let’s go back to the example of the sneaker company above. In addition to gifting each influencer a pair of their sneakers, the company plans to pay each $100 in fee. So, the perceived value of incentive for the influencer will be $200 ($100 in cash and $100 in sneakers). But, for the brand, the total investment will be $150 ($100 in cash and $50 in COGS on the shoes). Simple, right?

  • Delivery - How much will any shipping and handling cost you?

  • Agency fee - If an agency is managing your campaign, what are they charging you?

  • Estimated total investment - After taking into account all the other factors, what’s the total estimated investment of the campaign? Make sure to consider the total incentive for all the influencers you’re planning to work with.

MEASURE YOUR ESTIMATED RESULTS

Next, it’s time to estimate the results of your campaign. Depending on the KPIs you selected. Some of the things commonly measured in influencer marketing campaigns are:

  • Followers - How many followers do the campaign’s influencers have?

  • Publication weight - What’s the difference between, for example, a story or a post? On Instagram, posts are worth more than stories, as they’re more likely to be displayed without any action from the user. For example, a story might reach 20% of an influencer’s audience, and a post might reach half.

  • Impressions - Impressions are all the times your campaign content is displayed, whether it’s clicked/liked/commented on or not. You can estimate the impressions of a campaign by combining the previous two factors. For example, if an influencer has 10,000 followers and they’ve agreed to upload 1 post and 1 story for your campaign, you can estimate that the story will get around 2,000 impressions, and the story around 5,000. The total estimated impressions would therefore be 7,000.

    If the collaboration is for product only, and the product doesn’t have a very high value, you may not have to estimate impressions at this point. But if there’s any cash incentive involved, it will be a necessary part of your evaluation.

  • Interactions - Interactions are when users, well, interact with your campaign content in some way. On Instagram, interactions are measured in comments and likes. Remember that stories don’t allow comments and likes; while you can react to a story, that reaction functions more like a DM than a public like or comment.

  • Clicks - This one is simple: how many times did people click the links in your campaign materials?

  • Cost per mille (CPM) - Cost per mille uses the Latin word for one thousand. So, CPM is, in modern terms, the cost per 1,000 impressions. Take the cost of your paid advertising, divide it by 1,000, and you’re left with the CPM. In influencer marketing, CPM is usually around $4-10. The lower the CPM, the better, as you're getting more advertising for less money.

  • Cost per interactions (CPI) - Take the total cost of your advertising and divide it by the total interactions. This shows you the price for each interaction provoked by the campaign.

  • Cost per click (CPC) - What you pay for each click generated by the campaign. It’s the cost of paid advertising divided by the number of clicks.

These values represented above aren’t exact, definitive standards; rather, they’re based on our experiences with influencer marketing campaigns.

Master influencer marketing with Heepsy

An industry that already generates 6.6 billion dolars

A marketing proposal is the document that an agency prepares to present a campaign to the client for approval. It could also be presented by a marketing department to senior management, or by marketing analysts to their boss. While proposals may have been printed paper documents in the past, nowadays nearly all of them are visual presentations. This section will outline what to include to create a killer proposal that will help get your campaigns put into action.

Creating a great proposal

BASIC INFO

To start, calculate the total investment that the company plans to put into the campaign. Make sure you consider:

  • Target influencers - How many influencers will you work with?

  • Economic fee per influencer - How much will you pay each, in money?

  • Product cost per influencer - For this investment, there are a few things you have to consider. First, what is the market value of your product? Next, what is the cost of goods sold (COGS) of your product? COGS means, basically, the production cost of your product. This is important to know because while the influencer will only know the market value of your product, your investment is based on the COGS.

    For example: Your brand makes sneakers, which sell for $100 per pair in stores. For your campaign, you send a pair to each influencer. But, it only costs $50 in materials and labor for your company to make the sneakers. So really, you’ll be investing $50 in product for each influencer, not $100.

  • Incentive per influencer - What’s the total incentive you’ll provide to each influencer? Here you want to add up the economic fee + product cost per influencer. But remember! The perceived value per influencer will be higher than the total incentive you invest. Why? Because of COGS, of course! While your investment is based on the cost of production, the influencers will only know the market value.

    Let’s go back to the example of the sneaker company above. In addition to gifting each influencer a pair of their sneakers, the company plans to pay each $100 in fee. So, the perceived value of incentive for the influencer will be $200 ($100 in cash and $100 in sneakers). But, for the brand, the total investment will be $150 ($100 in cash and $50 in COGS on the shoes). Simple, right?

  • Delivery - How much will any shipping and handling cost you?

  • Agency fee - If an agency is managing your campaign, what are they charging you?

  • Estimated total investment - After taking into account all the other factors, what’s the total estimated investment of the campaign? Make sure to consider the total incentive for all the influencers you’re planning to work with.

CAMPAIGN STRATEGY

Here you want to basically outline your campaign and your strategy for making it successful:

  • Categories - the areas you want to impact

  • Product/Fee Value - what you’re going to send as incentive

  • Influencers & Followers - number of influencers and followers you’ve strategized

  • Publishing Guidelines - any specific rules for publications, like brand mentions or hashtags

  • Content Ideas - if you want to do things like giveaways or events

  • Campaign Timeline - the important dates in your campaign

If you have various strategies, you might want to include one slide that summarizes them all together.

ESTIMATED RESULTS

Based on the strategies you’re employing in your campaign, what do you estimate the results to be?

  • Amount of followers - number of people who follow the campaign’s influencers

  • Amount of impressions - the times your campaign will be displayed on screen

  • Amount of interactions - amount of people who will interact with your campaign

  • Number of clicks - amount people will click on your links

  • Audience - what kinds of people your campaign will reach (demographics like age, gender, location, etc., which can be accessed using Heepsy)

  • CPM, CPI, CPC - your estimated cost per mille, interaction and click

STYLE

Dedicate a slide to explain the style of the campaign publications. You might have defined aesthetic guidelines, like certain colors that have to be used, or certain locations where you want influencers to shoot their content. You could use a mood board here to give a sense of what the campaign will look like.

PRICING

If you’re a marketing agency, or if you’re a brand working with an agency, you should know some of the ways agencies typically price their fees. Agencies will sometimes charge per month. They might charge per influencer. Or, they could charge a percentage of what the brand offers the influencer (in money and product).

Let’s demonstrate this third method with an example. A sports brand wants to promote their newest sneakers, so they set up a campaign with 50 influencers. As incentive, each influencer received a pair of the sneakers, which retail for $100. The agency charges a 30% fee on this. So, 30% of the $100 sneakers comes to $30. And as there are 50 influencers involved in the campaign, the agency’s total fee would be $1,500.

CAMPAIGN LIFECYCLE

Explain the campaign’s deployment plan in five short steps:

  • Definition of campaign
  • Proposal of influencers
  • Activation of selected influencers
  • Tracking of campaign
  • Delivery of report and creatives

CONTACT

At the end of your proposal, note down any relevant contact information for the agency, team and anyone else involved in the campaign. You could also include links to the brand’s social media accounts if your campaign goals involve those.

What can you expect from an influencer marketing campaign? Well, there are some important things to keep in mind in order to ensure that your campaign goes according to plan.

Managing expectations

CONTACT RATE

Once you establish how many influencers you want to work with, contact double that. If you want to work with 10, reach out to 20. Not all of them will necessarily want to work with you, and not all will even respond.

RESPONSE RATE

Generally, about 40% of the influencers who you reach out to will respond. The response rate relies a lot on the type of incentive you offer:

  • Product: The higher the product value, the higher the response rate.
  • Experiences: The response rate is generally higher, as experiences are sometimes valued more than products.
  • Fee: The response rate is the highest, because the influencer will send you their fee and media kit. This doesn’t mean that they’ll accept your proposal, but they’ll reply to begin negotiations.

SHIPPING DATES

If your campaign includes products that need to be shipped out, make sure they arrive to the influencers 1-2 weeks before the scheduled publication dates. This will ensure they have enough time to prepare their content.

PAYMENT TERMS

Some influencers will ask for fees to be paid at the beginning, at the end, or half before and half after.

CAMPAIGN CANCELLATION

If there’s no contract, the influencer could choose to not go through with the campaign. In other situations, the brand may want to cancel the campaign, like if an influencer fakes their stats or violates the content guidelines. This is why it’s so important to define the campaign clearly from the beginning, as well as outline any reasons for cancellation.

WRITTEN CONFIRMATION

Close the deal in some form of writing, whether a contract or a simple email. If you make a deal on the phone, there’s no proof later. Likewise, when paying an influencer, make sure there’s some record of the transaction, like a receipt, invoice, or PayPal confirmation.

QUALITY OF RESULTS

When the influencers finally publish their content, it may not be 100% what was agreed upon. It’s important to focus on the overall results and remember that influencers should have a certain level of creative freedom when working on your campaigns. This will help you manage your expectations and perhaps see things from a new perspective.

Try the #1 influencer

marketing platform in the

world, for free

Identify and Analyze influencers in seconds

Free limited version

Upgrade / Downgrade anytime

Cancel anytime

Still having questions? Book a demo with us

Sitemap

Copyright 2020. All rights reserved.